Friday, May 28, 2021

Erdogan Inaugurates New Mosque Next To Greek Orthodox Church in Taksim Square


The newly-built Taksim Mosque, located in the center of Istanbul, at Taksim Square, was built right next to the Holy Trinity Orthodox Church, and was inaugurated today, 28 May 2021, by Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan, after Friday morning prayers. The inauguration also took place on the eve of the anniversary of the Fall of Constantinople by the Ottomans in 1453, which is consciously commemorated every year by the Turkish President.

Since becoming Mayor of Istanbul, Erdogan has repeatedly insisted that a mosque is absent from Taksim Square, where the only visible religious building there is an Orthodox Christian church (the Holy Trinity Church). Holy Trinity Church was erected in 1880 and is considered the largest Greek Orthodox shrine in Istanbul today. It was the first domed Christian church that was allowed to be built in Istanbul after the Fall of Constantinople in 1453.

Monday, May 24, 2021

A Tomb Venerated by Muslims for Generations in Turkey Is Actually the Tomb of the Ancient Greek Boxer Diagoras


It has long been known that Muslims in Turkey were taught to not acknowledge the Greek and Roman history of Turkey, claiming that their ancestors have lived there for thousands of years, of which they are direct descendants. Archaeology however easily disproves this theory, and below we have one example how mistakes like this when uncovered become a source of shock to locals.

In 2018 an Islamic holy site once believed to be the tomb of a Muslim holy figure was actually built for a famous Ancient Greek boxer.

Local worshippers had "sacrificed goats and chickens" at the Turkish tomb for decades – but now fear that their prayers were in vain.

The 2,400-year-old tomb was revered by local people in the Marmaris district of Turgut, but archaeologists recently confirmed that the tomb actually belonged to a boxer called Diagoras of Rhodes.

Thursday, April 1, 2021

Did Patriarch Athenagoras Serve as a Rabbi for Jews?

 

Many things have been written about the former Ecumenical Patriarch Athenagoras and his ecumenist activities, some of which can be viewed as positive steps, but there are also things so cringeworthy awful that one can hardly believe they are true without seeing the evidence first. One of these things is the claim that he had once served as a Rabbi to Jews at the same time he was a Metropolitan for Orthodox Christians.

As evidence for this claim, we are told to look into the archives of the New York Times, specifically for the issue dated November 25, 1940. The title of the article is "GREEK JEWS HERE PRAY FOR VICTORY". I decided to look it up to see what I would find. After paying a subscription fee, here is the article:

Saturday, March 27, 2021

The Hindu and the Holy Trinity

St. Gabriel the Fool for Christ and Confessor of Georgia
 
A Hinduist doubted the Orthodox doctrine of the Holy Trinity by contrasting it with the Hindu representation of the three persons of the divinity which are in harmony but are not of the same essence.

"You are wrong, my brother," replied Elder Gabriel, "our teaching has nothing to do with that which is human. It is all revealed by God. How can it therefore be wrong? However, because you are unable to understand it, I will give you a tangible example."

Thursday, February 18, 2021

Was Saint John of Kronstadt an Anti-Semite and Pogromist?


There is no evidence - neither in the texts of Father John of Kronstadt, nor the memoirs of his contemporaries - where he would have expressed something anti-Semitic. As for being called a "pogromist" - it is exactly the opposite. When in 1903 there was a terrible pogrom in Chisinau, Father John, together with Bishop Anthony Khrapovitsky, signed a sharp statement - "Word on the Chisinau Events", where he very harshly condemned the pogroms from a Christian standpoint. Furthermore, this text was later disseminated by Jewish societies, which attracted the attacks of extreme reactionaries on Father John.